My Lightroom Experience
Courtyard on Flickr.
Taken in the Castello Sforzesco Courtyard, Vigevano.

Courtyard on Flickr.

Taken in the Castello Sforzesco Courtyard, Vigevano.


osarracino - View my '10 faves or more' set on Flickriver

Before the storm on Flickr.
 Taken in the beautiful Cariati seaport. Take a look at this wonderful place in Calabria, south italy.Cariati

Before the storm on Flickr.


Taken in the beautiful Cariati seaport.

Take a look at this wonderful place in Calabria, south italy.
Cariati




osarracino - View my '10 faves or more' set on Flickriver

Teenage Memory on Flickr.
50 special by Lunapop Vespa is an Italian brand of scooter manufactured by Piaggio.  The name means wasp in Italian. The Vespa has evolved from a single model motor scooter manufactured in 1946 by Piaggio & Co. S.p.A. of Pontedera, Italy—to a full line of scooters and one of seven companies today owned by Piaggio—now Europe’s largest manufacturer of two-wheeled vehicles and the world’s fourth largest motorcycle manufacturer by unit sales From their inception, Vespa scooters have been known for their painted, pressed steel unibody which combines a complete cowling for the engine (enclosing the engine mechanism and concealing dirt or grease), a flat floorboard (providing foot protection), and a prominent front fairing (providing wind protection) into a structural unit.

Teenage Memory on Flickr.

50 special by Lunapop

Vespa is an Italian brand of scooter manufactured by Piaggio.

The name means wasp in Italian.

The Vespa has evolved from a single model motor scooter manufactured in 1946 by Piaggio & Co. S.p.A. of Pontedera, Italy—to a full line of scooters and one of seven companies today owned by Piaggio—now Europe’s largest manufacturer of two-wheeled vehicles and the world’s fourth largest motorcycle manufacturer by unit sales

From their inception, Vespa scooters have been known for their painted, pressed steel unibody which combines a complete cowling for the engine (enclosing the engine mechanism and concealing dirt or grease), a flat floorboard (providing foot protection), and a prominent front fairing (providing wind protection) into a structural unit.

osarracino - View my '10 faves or more' set on Flickriver

Textures Games on Flickr.
Vigevano is crowned by the Castello Sforzesco, a stronghold rebuilt 1492–94 for Ludovico Maria Sforza (Ludovico il Moro), the great patron born in the town, who transformed the fortification/hunting lodge of Luchino Visconti (who in turn had re-used a Lombard fortress) into a rich noble residence, at the cusp of Gothic and Renaissance.  Leonardo da Vinci was his guest at Vigevano, as was Bramante, who is ascribed with the tall tower that watches over the piazza from the Castello Sforzesco.  The old castle has a unique raised covered road, high enough for horsemen to ride through, that communicates between the new palace and the old fortifications; there is a Falconry, an elegant loggiato supported by 48 columns, and, in the rear area of the mastio, the Ladies’ Loggia made for Duchess Beatrice d’Este.

Textures Games on Flickr.

Vigevano is crowned by the Castello Sforzesco, a stronghold rebuilt 1492–94 for Ludovico Maria Sforza (Ludovico il Moro), the great patron born in the town, who transformed the fortification/hunting lodge of Luchino Visconti (who in turn had re-used a Lombard fortress) into a rich noble residence, at the cusp of Gothic and Renaissance.

Leonardo da Vinci was his guest at Vigevano, as was Bramante, who is ascribed with the tall tower that watches over the piazza from the Castello Sforzesco.

The old castle has a unique raised covered road, high enough for horsemen to ride through, that communicates between the new palace and the old fortifications; there is a Falconry, an elegant loggiato supported by 48 columns, and, in the rear area of the mastio, the Ladies’ Loggia made for Duchess Beatrice d’Este.

osarracino - View my '10 faves or more' set on Flickriver

Archs Games on Flickr.
Vigevano is crowned by the Castello Sforzesco, a stronghold rebuilt 1492–94 for Ludovico Maria Sforza (Ludovico il Moro), the great patron born in the town, who transformed the fortification/hunting lodge of Luchino Visconti (who in turn had re-used a Lombard fortress) into a rich noble residence, at the cusp of Gothic and Renaissance.  Leonardo da Vinci was his guest at Vigevano, as was Bramante, who is ascribed with the tall tower that watches over the piazza from the Castello Sforzesco.  The old castle has a unique raised covered road, high enough for horsemen to ride through, that communicates between the new palace and the old fortifications; there is a Falconry, an elegant loggiato supported by 48 columns, and, in the rear area of the mastio, the Ladies’ Loggia made for Duchess Beatrice d’Este.

Archs Games on Flickr.

Vigevano is crowned by the Castello Sforzesco, a stronghold rebuilt 1492–94 for Ludovico Maria Sforza (Ludovico il Moro), the great patron born in the town, who transformed the fortification/hunting lodge of Luchino Visconti (who in turn had re-used a Lombard fortress) into a rich noble residence, at the cusp of Gothic and Renaissance.

Leonardo da Vinci was his guest at Vigevano, as was Bramante, who is ascribed with the tall tower that watches over the piazza from the Castello Sforzesco.

The old castle has a unique raised covered road, high enough for horsemen to ride through, that communicates between the new palace and the old fortifications; there is a Falconry, an elegant loggiato supported by 48 columns, and, in the rear area of the mastio, the Ladies’ Loggia made for Duchess Beatrice d’Este.

osarracino - View my '10 faves or more' set on Flickriver

Golden details on Flickr.
The Galleria Vittorio Emanuele II is a double arcade in the center of Milan, Italy.  The structure is formed by two glass-vaulted arcades intersecting in an octagon covering the street connecting Piazza del Duomo to Piazza della Scala. The Galleria is named after Vittorio Emanuele II, the first king of united Italy.  It was originally designed in 1861 and built by Giuseppe Mengoni between 1865 and 1877. The street is covered by an arching glass and cast iron roof, a popular design for nineteenth-century arcades, such as the Burlington Arcade in London, which was the prototype for larger glazed shopping arcades, beginning with the Saint-Hubert Gallery in Brussels (opened in 1847), the Passazh in St Petersburg (opened in 1848), the Galleria Umberto I in Naples (opened in 1890) and the Budapest Galleria. The central octagonal space is topped with a glass dome.  The Milanese Galleria was larger in scale than its predecessors and was an important step in the evolution of the modern glazed and enclosed shopping mall, of which it was the direct progenitor.  It has inspired the use of the term galleria for many other shopping arcades and malls. Below the dome is the centre mosaic shield[Cite] of the mall, and to the west of the design is a tradition that suggests that you have a spin with your right heel on the mosaic bulls “attributes”, one of the 102 glass designs that make up the pavement of the Galleria’s splendid central octagon. Once a gesture to ward off evil, it has become part of the Milanese tradition and has such a following that a deep hole has formed in the pavement. The Galleria connects two of Milan’s most famous landmarks: The Duomo and the Teatro Alla Scala, but the Galleria is a landmark on its own right.

Golden details on Flickr.

The Galleria Vittorio Emanuele II is a double arcade in the center of Milan, Italy.

The structure is formed by two glass-vaulted arcades intersecting in an octagon covering the street connecting Piazza del Duomo to Piazza della Scala.

The Galleria is named after Vittorio Emanuele II, the first king of united Italy.

It was originally designed in 1861 and built by Giuseppe Mengoni between 1865 and 1877.

The street is covered by an arching glass and cast iron roof, a popular design for nineteenth-century arcades, such as the Burlington Arcade in London, which was the prototype for larger glazed shopping arcades, beginning with the Saint-Hubert Gallery in Brussels (opened in 1847), the Passazh in St Petersburg (opened in 1848), the Galleria Umberto I in Naples (opened in 1890) and the Budapest Galleria.

The central octagonal space is topped with a glass dome.

The Milanese Galleria was larger in scale than its predecessors and was an important step in the evolution of the modern glazed and enclosed shopping mall, of which it was the direct progenitor.

It has inspired the use of the term galleria for many other shopping arcades and malls. Below the dome is the centre mosaic shield[Cite] of the mall, and to the west of the design is a tradition that suggests that you have a spin with your right heel on the mosaic bulls “attributes”, one of the 102 glass designs that make up the pavement of the Galleria’s splendid central octagon.

Once a gesture to ward off evil, it has become part of the Milanese tradition and has such a following that a deep hole has formed in the pavement.

The Galleria connects two of Milan’s most famous landmarks: The Duomo and the Teatro Alla Scala, but the Galleria is a landmark on its own right.

osarracino - View my '10 faves or more' set on Flickriver

Milan Cathedral (Duomo di Milano) on Flickr.
Single long night exposure.

Milan Cathedral (Duomo di Milano) on Flickr.

Single long night exposure.

osarracino - View my '10 faves or more' set on Flickriver

Monumental cemetery on Flickr.
A wonderful place in Milan City The Milan Monumental Cemetery is located in an area of 250,000 mq. Inaugurated in 1866, it was designed by the architect Carlo Maciachini (1818-1899). The construction first met the hygienic and town-planning needs linked to the presence of a high number of burial places inside the town. Moreover, the Municipality wanted to give the community a representative place by joining the cult of the dead.  Within its walls, Monumentale gives hospitality to graves of different cults an religions, including the sections for non-Catholics and Jews. The work of Maciachini includes different stylists suggestions according to the eclectic taste of the age and it joins together the Pisano Gothic and the Lumbard Romanesque style with some inserts imitating the Byzantine style. The entrance square is dominated by the Memorial Chapel Famedio, a successful neologism indicating the temple dedicated to fame and giving hospitality to famous and well-deserving men.  The sculptures and building of the Monumental Cemetery show the town historical events and its artistic history from Realism and Eclecticism, to Liberty and Symbolism until the contemporary age, as if it were a real museum in the open air where the main Italian artists are represented.

Monumental cemetery on Flickr.

A wonderful place in Milan City

The Milan Monumental Cemetery is located in an area of 250,000 mq. Inaugurated in 1866, it was designed by the architect Carlo Maciachini (1818-1899).

The construction first met the hygienic and town-planning needs linked to the presence of a high number of burial places inside the town. Moreover, the Municipality wanted to give the community a representative place by joining the cult of the dead.

Within its walls, Monumentale gives hospitality to graves of different cults an religions, including the sections for non-Catholics and Jews.

The work of Maciachini includes different stylists suggestions according to the eclectic taste of the age and it joins together the Pisano Gothic and the Lumbard Romanesque style with some inserts imitating the Byzantine style.

The entrance square is dominated by the Memorial Chapel Famedio, a successful neologism indicating the temple dedicated to fame and giving hospitality to famous and well-deserving men.

The sculptures and building of the Monumental Cemetery show the town historical events and its artistic history from Realism and Eclecticism, to Liberty and Symbolism until the contemporary age, as if it were a real museum in the open air where the main Italian artists are represented.

osarracino - View my '10 faves or more' set on Flickriver

My Fall on Flickr.
Tramite Flickr: Impressed by those colours (clearly adjusted with lightroomn :)) First session with my new nikkor 70-300 mm VR 5.6. I think i’ll love it. Good Light to all. if you want to learn more about my post processing : details on post production

My Fall on Flickr.

Tramite Flickr:
Impressed by those colours (clearly adjusted with lightroomn :))
First session with my new nikkor 70-300 mm VR 5.6. I think i’ll love it.
Good Light to all.

if you want to learn more about my post processing : details on post production

osarracino - View my '10 faves or more' set on Flickriver

Danterpieces on Flickr.
One of my preferite mountain. I love it. I hope you will too after looking at this shot. cheers. If you want to learn more about my post processing : details on post production

Danterpieces on Flickr.

One of my preferite mountain.
I love it.
I hope you will too after looking at this shot.
cheers.

If you want to learn more about my post processing : details on post production

osarracino - View my '10 faves or more' set on Flickriver